Return to Home Page
Table Hockey Rocks in Southern California
 
Main Menu
Home
Table Hockey Tournaments
League Standings
Contact
Links
Frequently Asked Questions

Multimedia Menu
Photos
Videos
Articles
Blog
Downloads
Coming Soon

Community Menu
Forums
Live Chat
Find Players
Tributes

Official Forums Menu
Official ACTHF Forum
Official CTHA Forum
Official USTHA Forum

Donations Menu
Sponsors
Donate Here
Table Hockey Heaven Forum Index Table Hockey Heaven
Table Hockey Fourms
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Solutions to Computer Issues (Hackers, Viruses & BOTS)

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Table Hockey Heaven Forum Index -> Table Hockey Cafe
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Sabre_in_Virginia
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 24 Jan 2007
Posts: 489
Location: Mount Vernon, VA (Washington, DC)

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 8:24 am    Post subject: Solutions to Computer Issues (Hackers, Viruses & BOTS) Reply with quote

Please pass this on to your league mates.

One of us has had two email accounts with different providers hacked into. The hackers can read all of his old email, e.g. from banks whose sent him a new password, or love letters. They can send email on his behalf that he's stranded somewhere and needs a few dollars. You could at this moment be a victim and not know it if they chose to lay quiet for awhile.

Hackers can run computer programs that run dictionary's, names, etc against your email address's password box in order to hack into your email. Once in they can surreptitiously put a "BOT" installed on your computer. There are good bots and bad bots. Bad bots can sleep on your computer and be called to wake up and attack at a certain moment. That could be a bank to get a Denial of Service attack, that can shut down a bank's financial transactions or a country's infrastructure. Once in your computer's Registry files they are very difficult to remove.

To the point, spread the word that people's passwords should be strong to any and all accounts you may have. A strong password would be eight characters: two lower case, two upper case, two numbers and two symbols.

To read and verify what I am telling you:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_bot#Malicious_purposes

http://nortontoday.symantec.com/features/articles/spotlight_on_bots.php



An example of Anti-bot software protection. I am not recommending this software ("Norton's Anti-BOT") but simply letting you know defenses exist. I'd have it installed by a professional who can work with you to adjust the software so you understand how to use it.

http://nortontoday.symantec.com/features/articles/spotlight_on_bots.php


AS ALWAYS, do not respond to or open emails from people whom you do not know. Do not respond to emails from known commercial entities telling you there's a problem with your account, or there's a security violation or your subscription is about to expire. Rather, go to that commercial entities website using their website address (not the one in an email sent to you) and see if they've got something posted on their main page or within your account.


Last edited by Sabre_in_Virginia on Wed Apr 15, 2015 7:23 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sabre_in_Virginia
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 24 Jan 2007
Posts: 489
Location: Mount Vernon, VA (Washington, DC)

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 8:43 am    Post subject: Resources to Help You Reply with quote

The following website is linked to the US gov't. The information applies in Canada as well.

The following is a safe link for "Stay Safe Online" is from US Dept of Homeland Security (DHS)
http://www.dhs.gov/xprevprot/programs/gc_1158611596104.shtm



http://www.staysafeonline.org/

It is a little tricking following their story flow. Essentially, you have to click on the phrases in blue font, near the top left corner of each page. I've posted a few pages for you here to help you get around that site.

http://www.staysafeonline.org/content/online-threats

http://www.staysafeonline.org/content/core-protections

http://www.staysafeonline.org/content/safe-and-secure-practices

When you have questions or problems "How do I..." or "Who do I contact...", you can go to their "Tools & Resources" page http://www.staysafeonline.org/content/tools-resources to read blogs or ask questions!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
DeadlyRedly
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 22 Jan 2007
Posts: 536
Location: Victoria BC

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup, I have had 2 emails from a member here at THH saying he's stuck in a 3rd world country & needs money help! Rolling On Floor Laughing
_________________
Check our club out at www.coleco.webs.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Jim Rzonca
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 1887
Location: CHICAGO

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah yess...... The beauty of my primitive WebTv. Its can not get a virus.


Jim Rzonca
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
oilersfan99
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 30 Oct 2007
Posts: 302
Location: Kamloops BC

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Keeping your computer safe these days is not hard. It is essential though.

Compromised corporate networks and workstations provide a good portion of my salary, and it's mind boggling how many individuals and companies are not prepared.

You need to be proactive with your security. Especially if engaging in online purchases.

1.) ALWAYS change your passwords for your online and offline accounts. There is no password you or your administrator can not change. Rule of thumb is changing your password 90 days. I advise people to change passwords every 30 days. It's a bit of a pain, but easily worth it.

2.) Longer passwords are better. Use numbers and special characters.

3.) Don't store a list of usernames and passwords on your computer. I see this all the time. You can write them down and keep the list if you need too. Make sure it's in a secure place. If you keep it on a computer, encrypt it and try to keep it off a networked computer. That includes the internet.

4.) Don't use the same usernames or passwords for different accounts.

5.) Always, always update your operating system, antivirus and firewall, and ati spyware you are using. There are free alternatives for all of these security programs.

6.) Consider moving away from Windows. Linux is a viable option for novice users these days. Linux and Apple operating systems face fewer attacks than Windows.

7.) If you don't recognize the sender of an email, mark it as junk or spam. You can train email client software to recognize email as spam or junk. You can also set up whitelists. If an address is on a whitelist, it makes it to your inbox. All other email is discarded.

8.) Beware social engineering. Your bank, credit card holder, cops and government will NEVER send you emails asking for inforation.

9.) Consider getting a credit card that's only used for online purchases. Have a low limit. If you use Paypal, link it to this credit card or a bank account that is distinct and separate from all other bank accounts.

10.) Reformat or re-image your computer at least once a year. I clean out my personal computers every 4 months, and start fresh with clean installs of my operating systems. It takes time. I have the process down to 3 hours from blank operating system to all data and programs being re-loaded.

11.) Disable the options to save usernames and passwords in your browsers. Delete cookies on browser close too. This can be set up automatically in most browsers.

12.) Ditch WEP on your wireless network. It isn't secure. I can break it in a minute with software readily available on the internet. Most wireless routers still have WEP configured as default.WPA is okay. Even better, stay away from wireless networks for your financial transactions.

There's more - but that will help ensure your safe on the internet.

(whew)
_________________
Cheers,

Joel.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jim Rzonca
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 1887
Location: CHICAGO

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank ya Joel!

Jim Rzonca
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
oilersfan99
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 30 Oct 2007
Posts: 302
Location: Kamloops BC

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You bet Jim. It's a long winded post. Shocked
_________________
Cheers,

Joel.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
nuggs
Sophmore
Sophmore


Joined: 23 Jan 2007
Posts: 138

PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 5:30 pm    Post subject: Check your password strength Reply with quote

Hey guys, in addition to Joel's point about passwords, I have posted a link to Microsoft's password strength checker. This will tell you how strong (or weak) you password is.

http://www.microsoft.com/protect/yourself/password/checker.mspx
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DeadlyRedly
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 22 Jan 2007
Posts: 536
Location: Victoria BC

PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 5:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Check your password strength Reply with quote

nuggs wrote:
Hey guys, in addition to Joel's point about passwords, I have posted a link to Microsoft's password strength checker. This will tell you how strong (or weak) you password is.

http://www.microsoft.com/protect/yourself/password/checker.mspx


I played around with it by typing in passwords that look like mine (because I don't trust anything) & they were all weak. I then typed in this (1q2w3e4r5t6y7u8i9o8kj7h6g5f4d3s2a1) & it called that password medium! LOL
_________________
Check our club out at www.coleco.webs.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Cowboy
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 862
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Check your password strength Reply with quote

DeadlyRedly wrote:
nuggs wrote:
Hey guys, in addition to Joel's point about passwords, I have posted a link to Microsoft's password strength checker. This will tell you how strong (or weak) you password is.

http://www.microsoft.com/protect/yourself/password/checker.mspx


I played around with it by typing in passwords that look like mine (because I don't trust anything) & they were all weak. I then typed in this (1q2w3e4r5t6y7u8i9o8kj7h6g5f4d3s2a1) & it called that password medium! LOL


Reason that it is medium is because you have no capital letters and
perhaps because you have added no characters besides letters
and numbers. Smile

Warren
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
nuggs
Sophmore
Sophmore


Joined: 23 Jan 2007
Posts: 138

PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's exactly why. You need to mix upper and lower case letters, numbers, and characters to make a strong password...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sabre_in_Virginia
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 24 Jan 2007
Posts: 489
Location: Mount Vernon, VA (Washington, DC)

PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nuggs & Cowboy are correct. Quoted from my first post above:

Quote:
A strong password would be eight characters: two lower case, two upper case, two numbers and two symbols.



Excellent addition to this post "Oilersfan"! To have you and others supplement this posting with accurate information will have a more powerful effect on readers than if I alone made some long solo posts. As I am now about to do... Shocked

To the rest of you, good back and forth discussion! I enourage others among you that if you have the slightest of questions to post it here, because that will help everyone.

I realize table hockey and THH is an entertainment and escapist activity from our daily grinds. We learn best, however, when our minds are most open. I think here, versus a classroom, would be such a place. You can relax, ask questions in a post or send me your questions. I suspect, "Oilerfan", would offer his services as well.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------



For Your Information and Protection. Plus Job Opportunities

* Change Management.
I would suggest to anyone reading this thread, to print out and tape by your computer or create a 3-ring binder with "Oilersfans" suggestions. You can write what you did for each step, problems you encountered and the solutions. You'll be surprised how much you'll learn in a short amount of time.


* Backing up your data - External hard drives.
Before you go playing around with my or "Oilerfan's" suggestions, buy an external hard-drive. Maybe half a terabyte if you have a lot of photos, etc on your computer. One without software that ties you to a subscription fee. Then back up everything from your computer to it. It will probably take half a day, so start it in the early evening and let it run over night. Once done, do a sample check that things were copied over.


* Redundant back ups - Internet.
Next, you might also want to also back up select files onto the Internet. (Now you've got back ups in two places and what you placed online should be available to you anywhere).


* Fidelity.
When it comes to copying music, photos, etc. Make sure you copy onto your computer, e.g. from your cd player or camera in full transfer. By this I mean, often by default files are compressed. In the case of music or photos, this means you lose some of the fidelity or trueness of the original content. This touches upon archiving data.


* Archiving.
Do not assume placing something on a disc, that the information on that disc will live forever or remain true forever. I was suprised to find out that digital tape remains a superior way to go. Fact is, from a risk management point of view, its is best to save your valuables in a few places in a few different means (online, disc, external hard-drive).


* Learning & Your Memory.
Anyhow, get a three-ring binder. Print out "Oilerfans" suggestions and as appropriate create a tab for each of his suggestions. Then work to achieve them and learn as you go by keeping a record. The record can also serve you in the future when a year from now you try to remember what you did, why or how.


* Resources - Wikipedia, USA - DHS, Canada - Public Safety.

Wikipedia. In addition to the sources I pointed out in the initial posts, which you may or may not find helpful, is another quick and easy source of information: Wikipedia. When you find terminology that you do not understand, you can learn more at Wikipedia.
English ---> http://en.wikipedia.org
French ---> http://fr.wikipedia.org


Canada - Public Safety
Here's a good place to start with the government of Canada's resource:
English ---> http://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/prg/em/ccirc/index-eng.aspx
French ---> http://www.securitepublique.gc.ca/prg/em/ccirc/index-fra.aspx

USA - DHS
Here's a good place to start with the US' government:
http://www.dhs.gov/xprevprot/programs/gc_1202746448575.shtm


-------------------------------------------------

* Helping to Protect Your Community. It is easy!
Finally, if you've read this far and might also like to help your community regarding security, safety and emergency response in general, you can sign up for training. I think you get certified. Hey, it is something to add to your resume and help people at the same time.


* Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT)
"The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community." ~ DHS
http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/


----------------------------------------------------------------


* New Job. Good Salary.
Under normal circumstances I would not delve into what we do for a living or this, but since I know people are losing their jobs, you might have a family to feed and we are a "community", then let me offer this: if you'd like to boost your salary, do a job you can sometimes do from home or travel a lot if you prefer, and either have or are willing to study for a CISSP, CISM or CISA certification, I can help you with career direction and advice. This goes for Americans and Canadiens. One of you readers was hired by my company soon after the SNAC tournament in Detroit last year and is now jetting all over Europe and the M.E.

~~~ Do not post questions about jobs or your personal information here. Please private message (PM) - button below.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

To Paul (THH Owner/Operator) "thank you for hosting this thread and providing a public service to the table hockey community." Clapping

~Sabre_in_Virginia
Angel
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
sklump
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 740
Location: Ottawa

PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more thing, if you are still running Win2K or earlier, the (LANMAN) password hashing algorithm is weak: it splits up the password into two halves and hashes each separately. It is computationally much more feasible to crack two short password hashes than one long one. WinXP and beyond fix this vulnerability. Upgrading is a good idea.

If running IIS, patching to the latest version is crucial.

Finally (for now), it is a very good idea use least privilege: i.e., only use a designated Administrator-privilege account when needed (e.g., installing or removing software, etc); otherwise, login with an ordinary account.

As it happens, I have 13 or 14 years in the IT Security world. These are only a few tips out of the squillions of things you can do to secure your network. It can become not only a full time job but a career gravity well.

Obviously, keep off-system backups of anything you couldn't stand to lose. This applies from work in progress to the swathes of numbers in your phone. Backups have saved my bacon on a number of occasions, and the lack of such has burned me horribly, once early in my career.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sabre_in_Virginia
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 24 Jan 2007
Posts: 489
Location: Mount Vernon, VA (Washington, DC)

PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 3:21 pm    Post subject: Computer Virus That Locks Access to Your Own Files Reply with quote

I know there is a Crypto Virus going around the table hockey world. Well, while that is true, I'll spin it that way to get your attention.

Though this is not table hockey per se, my aim is to educate and protect our table hockey community as I have in the past, e.g. SuperDave3n2 vs SuperDave2n3, knows what I mean.

And, indeed, recently I know of two table hockey players/organizers whose computer files are completely locked and unavailable to them. Though geography matters little in the age of the Internet, they're on opposite coasts.

While I was researching how to help one, I was contacted by the other. So, that prompted me to try and help you prevent more infections.

If some of you would like tips, etc, email me and I can route you to US Gov't based website to help the public protect their computers. Their written fairly easy to understand.

First, there are different crypto viruses going around. Of those going around, they each use differing methods to infect your computer. Some want you to pay a ransom and they will then send you the key to unlock your files (or so you hope).

* Some through Yahoo! ads (newest), where your computer gets infected by your clicking on an ad.
* Others by your clicking on a link or attachment within an email sent to you from what appear to be your local, state or federal government or other genuine-looking business entity.

Those are the methods. As to which virus you got, obviously I do not know. Here, however, is one means to fix your problem.
https://www.decryptcryptolocker.com

I'd like to say, I will return to give you more information on this, but my free time is limited. Read my previous notes on this subject.

Also, consider daily backup of your files to two different external drives. You can automate them. And, I strongly suggest either emailing yourself using an email service you can log into anywhere and send yourself your important files. Or purchase a small online file storage service to store your important files or documents (or family photos).

~Sabre in Virginia
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sabre_in_Virginia
2nd Team All Star
2nd Team All Star


Joined: 24 Jan 2007
Posts: 489
Location: Mount Vernon, VA (Washington, DC)

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2015 8:15 am    Post subject: Good News! Reply with quote

Good news! - for those of you who have contacted me about you and your computer becoming a victim of ransomware (see Note 1 below). In the last few days a solution has been accomplished!

You should be able to recover your computer and all of your files! (See Note 2 below)

"The Netherland's National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU) recently got its hands on a CoinVault command-and-control server (a type of ransomware that has been infecting Windows systems since last November) and, upon examining it, discovered a large database of decryption keys."

For your solution, go to: https://noransom.kaspersky.com/

NOTE 1: Ransomware is a type of malicious software used by cybercriminals thatís designed to extort money from their victims, either by encrypting data on the disk or by blocking access to the system. Ransomware is commonly installed by triggering a vulnerability in the victimís computer, which is generally exploited by users inadvertently opening a phishing email or accessing a malicious website that was created by the attackers. Kaspersky Labís experts found Ransomware attachments being sent out in phishing emails from attackers claiming to be from popular online booking services, financial institutions and social networks.

https://blog.kaspersky.com/ransomware-cyber-extortion/

NOTE 2: If you do have ransomware and successfully remove it, I STRONGLY suggest you copy your documents, photos and files over to an external hard drive and then WIPE YOUR HARD DRIVE. Otherwise, you will have left the ransomware on your computer and the ability to be a victim again.

* If you've been a victim, you may also want to work with, e.g. Best Buy's Geek Squad to get their opinion or have them save your files and wipe your computer for you. Then I'd also work with your local Internet service provider to help secure you home system, e.g. ensure Firewall is working, that you have strong wireless encryption in your home (often they install the lowest oldest encryption, when it is a selection to have the stronger encryption).
=================

Since there are different methods used to encrypt the files on your computer
so too are there different decryption keys. Just like there are different methods to lock doors and to each a different key to open them.

So I also offered in my last post another solution to those of you who have been a victim of an older version ransomware going around. That solution, https://www.decryptcryptolocker.com Where you visit there site and they check your computer and endeavor to fix it.

=============

To future proof this from ever happening to you, I recommend you back up your "key" files (special family photos, key life documents, etc) to an on-site (your home) storage solution, e.g. two separate external storage devices. But, if you have a fire or act of God, I suggest to complement that with off-site storage location (a service provider for fee) or use an Internet-based email service that offers free storage and/or email it to yourself.

You should consider password protecting your documents should they have personally identifiable information (PII) (date of birth, SSN, etc). And never send to anyone your PII to anyone without at least password protecting your document and either telephoning them the password or sending a separate email with it.

~Sabre_in_Virginia
PS - If you have any questions about computer security, feel free to ask.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Table Hockey Heaven Forum Index -> Table Hockey Cafe All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Table Hockey Heaven - Copyright 2007